Eighteen edibles for poor soil

Onion flower

Onion flower

Onion flower
Sweet potato
Blackberries
Olive

March 4, 2014

Would you like to create your edible landscaping but your yard has really poor soil?

Of course, you could truck in some compost and amendments, but if you have a large lot, this could be unfeasible.

All is not lost!

Here are 18 edible plants that do very well in soil with poor nutritional value:

Ground covers:

1) Sweet potatoes
2) Goldenberry (also known as ground cherry and gooseberry) -- Physalis peruviana
3) Nasturtiums
4) Miner's lettuce -- Montia perfoliata
5) Purslane
6) Saffron crocus -- Crocus sativus

Small flowering plants:

7) Pot Marigold -- Calendula officinalis
8) Alliums (garlic, onion, chives, etc)
9) Thyme
10) Legumes (clover, vetch, peas, beans, etc)

Shrubs

11) Fuchsia (F. splendens, F. microphylla, and F. coccinea have the best fruit)
12) Oregon grape -- Mahonia aquifolium
13) Bearberry -- Arctostaphylos uva-ursi
14) Blackberries

Trees (and other tree-height things)

15) Olive -- Olea europaea
16) Sweet Chestnut -- Castanea sativa
17) Bamboo
18) Italian Stone Pine -- Pinus pinea

I hope these spur on some ideas for your edible landscaping!

Which are your favorite edible plants that do well in poor soil? Did I forget any?

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Mar 04, 2014
Herbs and Poor Soil
by: Jamie

I have found that most all herbs do well in poor soil. Chamomile, Sage, Oregano, Bee Balm, Hyssop, all Mints, eucalyptus and lavender are just a few that I grow without ammendeng the soil from year to year. As a matter of fact, these plants have been in the same spot for over 6 years and continue to thrive and expand.

I find that herbs are under appreciated in the American garden and vital to optimal health for the body so I try to incorporate as many to my landscaping as possible.


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